Evolution of Methodologies

The team have been busy again this month, developing pathways from the project for impact. Claire and Hannah were invited to share learnings and speak at the Evolution of Methodologies conference on 29th June, held at The National Glass Centre in Sunderland.

80 participants gathered to consider how artists and designers are evolving practice based research at the conference funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council  and organised by the Northumbria- Sunderland Centre for Doctoral Training in Art and Design.

Together, we critically interrogated practice-led research methodologies across creative disciplines. We discussed the Participatory Action Research methodology and design thinking practices which have informed the work to date. The slides of our presentation can be viewed here:

And the whole session can be watched on demand here (we start at 1:06:35):

https://sml.sunderland.ac.uk/player?autostart=n&fullscreen=y&width=835&height=505&videoId=2046&quality=hi&captions=n&chapterId=0

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Q&A session with the participants

The presentation generated a lot of discussion in the Q&A session, and the team has since been invited to contribute a chapter to a new book to be published by Routledge: ‘Transcending Disciplinarity; Reconnecting Philosophies of Research Design and Methodology in Art and Science’.

Ecsite 2016: impact through sharing

Team members Andy Lloyd and Bethan Ross shared the learnings and aspirations of the live research experiment ongoing through the interactive research pod at Centre for Life with the participants of the European conference for science centres and museums this month. The 27th Ecsite Annual Conference took place in June in Graz, Austria. It gathered 1,081 participants from 53 different countries, making it the second largest Ecsite Annual Conference ever.

As well as Beth and Andy presenting at the conference, Andy was interviewed for the European network of science centres and museums Magazine – Spokes#20 – June 2016. In it, Andy reports:

“I received a lot of interest in the live research exhibit in the Brain Zone. The experiment was devised by Anthropology researchers from Durham University. They are interested in social learning and “cumulative culture”, the way ideas are shared and passed on.  Previous research with non-human primates suggest that copying is very common, but humans are especially good at innovating and being creative. Our exhibit explores how the environmental conditions influence the creativity people demonstrate. We can change whether people are able to see and interact with each other as they play with building blocks, and record what they make. Interest was very high from other science centre people, so we have created a free pdf to show what we did and how we did it, that anyone can access here. The researchers want to track how the research ideas spread, so if you do make use of any of this we would love to hear how it goes”.

We’ve added a new Resources page to this website so that anyone can download our free guide in pdf format: How To… create an Interactive Research Pod.